Queensland Labor Silent On Government Funding

With the ever increasing lists of projects being cancelled by the current LNP Government, any reasonable person would have thought that the Opposition would be scrutinising everything that tax payers money is spent on.

Except this hasn’t been the case.

As mentioned in the post Whats On The List Of Priorities For State Funding?, the LNP Government is committed to handing over $110 Million to “revitalise” racing in Queensland. This is despite the Queensland Premier saying that Queensland doesn’t have enough money to fund the Federally initiated NDIS, or a proposed $18 Million vet lab at James Cook University in Townsville. Even going as far as to say that unless government spending was reined in, Queensland would become the Spain of Australia.

And what has the opposition said about the proposed $25 Million Greyhound track at Cronulla Park?

Would you believe, absolutely nothing?!

Numerous attempts have been made to contact the Opposition Leader Annastacia Palaszczuk about this, with all of them going unanswered. I have even gone as far as to send a tweet to her twitter account, still with no response.

I don’t know about you, though I am starting to think that maybe all this talk about Queensland Labor getting out there and listening to people and holding the LNP Government accountable is just double speak for “We aren’t really that interested in what you have to say, we just want the media to say we are”.

Read More:

Advertisements

Whats On The List Of Priorities For State Funding?

Hardly a day goes by where the media and the ALP opposition aren’t making some sort of noise about the withdrawal of funding for particular projects by the current LNP government.

In recent weeks, we have seen the closure of GoPrint, Q-Fleet, SDSFanfare, the Darling Downs Correctional Centre, and Skilling Queensland, because they were running at a loss or the Queensland Government just couldn’t afford to fund them any longer and work towards reducing the current debt level.

Yet, there is one project that is going ahead despite declining interest, the LNP government is willing to hand over a minimum of $110 Million dollars, which the state cannot afford, as part of an infrastructure upgrade and in a vain attempt to revitalise this ailing industry.

That industry is Racing.

Read more:

The Case Against The States

As could be expected, and with almost predictable regularity, the debate over Australia becoming a republic is slowly starting to gain momentum again. This time it is being helped along by those who are feeling the early stages of relevance deprivation syndrome, in no part due to this country’s new found interest with the monarchy. Dr Williams’ article in The Courier Mail being the most recent case.

Whilst this discussion may be an emotive subject for the average Australian, the relevance and importance of Australia becoming a republic is of little consequence to reducing the increasing pressure that we are all under to make ends meet, whilst the far more relevant question is not even being whispered.

Do we need to have state governments?

For a relatively small nation of 22 Million people, we appear to be over governed and I doubt that there would be anyone, apart from politicians, who would disagree with it.

The existence of three levels of government is restricting the economic growth of this country, and wasting tax payers money due to the duplication and triplication of responsibilities.

Funding for roads, health and education are a prime example of this. Looking at roads in particular, each level of government has particular roads that they are responsible for. All of which are in a state of disrepair.

How many State Government approved projects though out the country, have been canceled after they were rejected by the Federal Government?

Two examples from Queensland over the past few years come to mind straight away.
In 2009 we saw the Traverston Dam Project, which had been approved by the Bligh Labor Government, rejected by then Federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett.
And more recently, the Alpha Coal Project approved by the Campbell Newman led LNP Government, and delayed by the current Federal Environment Minister, Tony Burke.

Continue reading

How Can A Tax Save The Environment?

“A carbon price is critical to addressing climate change,” Australian Greens Leader, Christine Milne.

This one simple sentence is enough to have the Clayton’s Environmentalists raising their glasses in agreeance and shouting “Here, Here”. Though will it really save the environment, and what other measures could the government have been taken?

First and foremost, making something more expensive will not stop people using it. All you have to do is have a look at the number of people who still drink and smoke, despite the regular price increases.

Putting a price on carbon will ultimately only benefit those who are trading in Carbon Credits.

It is widely acknowledged that Australia will not be able to keep up with the demand for carbon credits, which means that the short fall will have to come from overseas. How much pressure will this put on jobs, our economy, the ever-increasing cost of living, and national debt?

Any extra cost incurred by the producer, due to the purchase of carbon credits, or fluctuations in the carbon price will be automatically passed on to the consumer. The consumer, having grown accustomed to their big screen TV, X-Box, and various other household appliances and already stretched to breaking point on their household budget will simply go without in other areas that aren’t as important.

Who knows, this could even include buying cheaper homebrand products at the supermarket, a majority of which are imported, or even resorting to junk and fast food in an effort to feed their family.

Continue reading

Public Question To Dr. Paul Williams. Re: Australia’s Republic Debate

Below is a copy of the email that I sent Dr Paul Williams, Senior lecturer at the School of Humanities on Griffith University’s Gold Coast campus, three days ago.

At the time of publishing this post, it still has not been replied to.

Whilst I am not naive enough to think that he would personally respond to my email straight away, I am sure that there would be someone in his office that would be able to set up an autoresponder to say something along the lines of “Unfortunately Dr Williams is unable to immediately answer your email, though he does appreciate you contacting him and will respond to your email when he is able to”

Then again, I received three of these emails from former ALP Lord Mayoral Candidate Ray Smith, and never got a reply.

I’d also like to point out that the use of the term educate Australians is Orwellian double speak for tell Australians this is what is going to happen so you may as well agree with it. Aren’t we currently being educated about the ETS/Carbon Tax?

Good morning Dr Williams,

I refer to your article that appeared in today’s The Courier-Mail, titled “Republic debate should not be forgotten”
http://www.couriermail.com.au/ipad/republic-debate-should-not-forgotten/story-fn6ck620-1226391567257

Continue reading

The Big Announcement

By now most of the readers of this blog would be aware that in 2013 I will be throwing my hat in the the ring of election madness as a candidate for a Senate seat in Queensland.

Why after all these years of having a go at they way politicians govern, would I possibly want to become one of them?

The answer is simple really, though a little bit corny too. I am doing this for the people of Queensland, and Australia in general. We have all been mislead and hoodwinked by the current crop of politicians for far too long, and a complicit media further perpetuates the deception. So much for their position as the Fourth Estate.

I can no longer sit idly by commenting on things after have happened or raising awareness before they do. So now I am asking the people of Queensland to vote me into a Senate seat, and into a position to stop the continual deception from happening.

When we learn about politics and voting, at first we are taught to be cautious and be wary of what they say. Then as time goes by we start voting for the politicians based on the party they represent, not what they can do for the electorate. The level of caution that we first displayed, should be repeated every time that we put pencil to paper and vote for someone.

The political party game that is being played has let us all down at both the State and Commonwealth level, and has let us down in a big way.

We have seen a Carbon Tax/Emission Trading Scheme become law because the leader of the Federal Australian Labor Party made a deal with The Australian Greens to form a minority government. This is despite her promise to the Australian people that there would be no ETS in a government that she leads, and the fact that a majority of Australian’s actually voted against the ALP.
In Queensland we have seen the virtual annihilation of the ALP at the last State election, due in no part to the perceived arrogance and mistrust in the party’s former leader.
In NSW, legislation has been passed to allow shooting in National Parks after the government did a deal with the two members from The Shooter’s Party, to allow their privatisation bill to pass.

So why should Queenslanders vote for me?

Continue reading

Republic: To Be Or Not To Be?

This question alone is usually enough to get even the most sedate politically apathetic person fired up, and happy to voice their views on the subject.

Very rarely will you hear anyone say that they don’t have an opinion on the matter or really care one way or the other, with people being either for or against the idea.

There are those who believe that the time has now come for Australia to cut ties with the United Kingdom and take it’s rightful place on the world stage as an independent sovereign nation.

Whilst those on the other side of the fence support our current system believing that there is no need to ‘fix’ that which is not broken. Asserting that it has served us well in the past, and will see us through into the future.

Can either side claim to be right in this discussion, and if so, which one?
In this two part post, I will discuss the arguments and reasons put forward by both sides, starting with the pro-Republic side.

Australia isn’t an independent nation without becoming a republic.
This is statement couldn’t be further from the truth, because Australia became an independent nation on any one of the three dates listed below.

10 Jan 1920 – As a member state of the League of Nations.
Article X of the Covenant of The League of Nations guarantees soveriegn nation status when it became part of international law

Continue reading